Castle Preservation and Restoration

Castle Preservation and Restoration

We could create a stand along blog on the subject of castle preservation and restoration. The fact that many castles have survived for many hundreds of years with varying degrees of intervention gives them a sense of permanence, but ruins of castles like Richard the Lionheart’s Château Gaillard (pictured above) remind us that survival is often politically motivated and always requires a passionate visionary. Dan Snow described the challenges faced by visitors and researchers to Malaga’s Gibralfaro Castle, which were subject to improvements made during Franco’s regime.  This type of restoration project is motivated by attracting tourists and not necessarily historical preservation. As mentioned above, Château Gaillard now lies in ruins.  We have heard that it was used as a rock quarry at some point in the past to build a nearby abbey or church.  I believe this happened was because Chateau Gaillard was build by an English king on French soil.  It’s very existence  didn’t mesh with the power narrative put forward by the French victors. Thus it wasn’t considered worth preserving, despite the fact when it was built it was considered the finest castle of its age. The granddaddy of military fortification restoration was Eugène Viollet-le Duc.  Perhaps, his most ambitious monument was the walled city of Carcassone, but he also did work on Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris. He also wrote treatises on French architecture and much of how we imagine castles to be can be ascribed to his nineteenth century romanticism of Gothic architecture. A Masters thesis written by Francesc Xavier Costa Guix called Viollet-le-Duc’s Restoration of the Cite of Carcassone: a nineteenth century monument describes the challenges inherent...

Medieval Gardens: Form and Function

Standing as stone skeletons on cliffs or hilltops, we know castles are really only a shadow of their former selves.  On a day to day basis, castles fulfilled purposes beyond the defence of the realm and were also administrative centres where a myriad of activities would have taken place but the evidence of which have been erased by time.  We know, for example, many castles would have possessed gardens.  Medieval gardens might have produced foods like a kitchen garden, but also would have also been the source of herbs that were used in medieval medicine.  Garden spaces were pointed out to us at least two of our Battle Castle sites.  Medieval gardens did embrace key ideas about form and function. At Conwy Castle the east side of the castle was dominated by a second barbican which provided access from the sea gate, meant to resupply the castle in case of siege.  This was the site of a garden overlooked by the royal apartments. Sometimes a flower garden, its function changed over the years and at one time even contained fruit trees. My theory is that a good garden space is anywhere you find people absorbing sunshine. Benjamin Michaudel, our castle architecture expert challenged us to imagine that this space in front of the Knights Hall at Crac des Chevaliers would have likely housed a garden.  With a healthy dose of imagination, the stone walls give way to rich textures of green.  Given that the knights who built the castle were of the Hospitaller Order and they provided medical services to pilgrims in the Holy Land, we can be sure that medicinal herbs...